Holly School District RE-3


A Note from Southeast Mental Health

These are challenging times. Feeling stress about the COVID-19 pandemic is normal. A healthy amount of stress helps us react in a way that protects ourselves and our loved ones when needed. Too much uncontrolled stress, however, is unhealthy. Our children are looking to us at every moment for how we respond and react to the changes happening daily. They are watching how we respond to the news stories, how we tell them spring break trips are canceled, and how we communicate that school is closed. 

Research tells us that the presence of a compassionate, safe adult calms kids and reduces their stress level. Managing stress is the most important step in taking care of your children’s and your own mental health during this time. 

Families and children can do the following to manage stress and anxiety associated with COVID-19:

  • Set limits on your exposure to news and media related to COVID-19. Allow yourself to get the facts but avoid overexposing yourself as this can cause increasing anxiety and worry.

  • Stay present. In uncertain times, it is not unusual to worry about the future. Try to keep perspective on what is going well. 

  • Focus on what you can control. Just as children find calmness when they have a sense of control, adults do as well. Attempt to control your family’s routine, quality time together, modeling of good hygiene habits, and social distancing. 

  • Talk to each other. Engage, daily, in open check-ins and compassionate conversations. Listen to each other and attend to your needs and those of your family members. 

  • Enjoy being together as much as you can. Many caregivers don’t often have the opportunity to watch their children learn. As we are home together, take the time to see their schoolwork and participate in their learning. 

  • Keep yourself healthy. Eat good things, drink lots of water, get plenty of sleep, get physical exercise, avoid excessive use of alcohol or other substances, take care of your mind and body. 

  • Social distancing does not mean social isolation. Stay connected to friends and family, virtually or by phone. We are maintaining physical distance to keep us all healthy; we must maintain our relational closeness to protect our mental wellness. Practice this daily.   

Here are some questions a child might ask.  Answering truthfully with age-appropriate responses is perfectly ok:

  • Q:  Why can’t I play on the playground with those two boys who are there?  A: We need to take a break from playing closely with other kids so we can all stay healthy.

  • Q:  Why can’t I see grandma?  A: If we give grandma space like this, it can help make sure she stays healthy.

  • Consider ways to help children stay connected to older relatives through phone calls or video chat.  Read more here for tips on doing this.


Below are some tips for different age groups.  For a comprehensive resource to help children understand and communicate about what’s going on, visit SAMHSA’s Talking with Children:  Tips for Caregivers , Parents, and Teachers During Infectious Disease Outbreaks.


Early Elementary-Aged Students

  • Ask age-appropriate questions and provide age-appropriate responses. Do you have any questions about why we are not going to school right now?

  • Limit the amount of information you initiate, let your child lead the conversation. 

  • Correct misinformation calmly. Relate the situation, such as coronavirus symptoms, to something they can understand, like a cold or the flu. When they are sick, their doctors take good care of them and help them get better, and that is what doctors are working to do now. 

  • Reassure your child that they are safe and adults are working hard to keep everyone healthy.  

  • Help your child feel a sense of control and teach them what they can do to keep your family and others healthy by practicing good hygiene (washing hands while singing twinkle, twinkle little star and catching your cough). 



Middle School-Aged Students

  • Limit television viewing and exposure to social media. Much of what your adolescent might hear or see about COVID-19 may cause anxiety or could be inaccurate. Children and adolescents tend to personalize events and do not always have the larger context to process some of the information they may hear without experiencing a great deal of anxiety.  

  • Be honest and accurate. Provide facts about the symptoms of COVID-19, talk about the measures being taken to help people. 

  • Validate their feelings, fears, and anxiety. Don’t be afraid to check in regularly. Ask how your child is feeling. Have they heard any new information about COVID-19 they would like to talk about? Be a safe and supportive outlet for your child. 

High School-Aged Students

  • Discuss the issue in a more in-depth fashion. Ask and answer questions. 

  • Together, look at appropriate sources of COVID-19 facts. Provide factual information about the current status of COVID-19. Having such knowledge can help facilitate a sense of control and limit anxiety. 

Resources:

Southeast Mental Health (En Espanol)

These are challenging times. Feeling stress about the COVID-19 pandemic is normal. A healthy amount of stress helps us react in a way that protects ourselves and our loved ones when needed. Too much uncontrolled stress, however, is unhealthy. Our children are looking to us at every moment for how we respond and react to the changes happening daily. They are watching how we respond to the news stories, how we tell them spring break trips are canceled, and how we communicate that school is closed. 

Research tells us that the presence of a compassionate, safe adult calms kids and reduces their stress level. Managing stress is the most important step in taking care of your children’s and your own mental health during this time. 

Families and children can do the following to manage stress and anxiety associated with COVID-19:

  • Set limits on your exposure to news and media related to COVID-19. Allow yourself to get the facts but avoid overexposing yourself as this can cause increasing anxiety and worry.

  • Stay present. In uncertain times, it is not unusual to worry about the future. Try to keep perspective on what is going well. 

  • Focus on what you can control. Just as children find calmness when they have a sense of control, adults do as well. Attempt to control your family’s routine, quality time together, modeling of good hygiene habits, and social distancing. 

  • Talk to each other. Engage, daily, in open check-ins and compassionate conversations. Listen to each other and attend to your needs and those of your family members. 

  • Enjoy being together as much as you can. Many caregivers don’t often have the opportunity to watch their children learn. As we are home together, take the time to see their schoolwork and participate in their learning. 

  • Keep yourself healthy. Eat good things, drink lots of water, get plenty of sleep, get physical exercise, avoid excessive use of alcohol or other substances, take care of your mind and body. 

  • Social distancing does not mean social isolation. Stay connected to friends and family, virtually or by phone. We are maintaining physical distance to keep us all healthy; we must maintain our relational closeness to protect our mental wellness. Practice this daily.   

Here are some questions a child might ask.  Answering truthfully with age-appropriate responses is perfectly ok:

  • Q:  Why can’t I play on the playground with those two boys who are there?  A: We need to take a break from playing closely with other kids so we can all stay healthy.

  • Q:  Why can’t I see grandma?  A: If we give grandma space like this, it can help make sure she stays healthy.

  • Consider ways to help children stay connected to older relatives through phone calls or video chat.  Read more here for tips on doing this.


Below are some tips for different age groups.  For a comprehensive resource to help children understand and communicate about what’s going on, visit SAMHSA’s Talking with Children:  Tips for Caregivers , Parents, and Teachers During Infectious Disease Outbreaks.


Early Elementary-Aged Students

  • Ask age-appropriate questions and provide age-appropriate responses. Do you have any questions about why we are not going to school right now?

  • Limit the amount of information you initiate, let your child lead the conversation. 

  • Correct misinformation calmly. Relate the situation, such as coronavirus symptoms, to something they can understand, like a cold or the flu. When they are sick, their doctors take good care of them and help them get better, and that is what doctors are working to do now. 

  • Reassure your child that they are safe and adults are working hard to keep everyone healthy.  

  • Help your child feel a sense of control and teach them what they can do to keep your family and others healthy by practicing good hygiene (washing hands while singing twinkle, twinkle little star and catching your cough). 



Middle School-Aged Students

  • Limit television viewing and exposure to social media. Much of what your adolescent might hear or see about COVID-19 may cause anxiety or could be inaccurate. Children and adolescents tend to personalize events and do not always have the larger context to process some of the information they may hear without experiencing a great deal of anxiety.  

  • Be honest and accurate. Provide facts about the symptoms of COVID-19, talk about the measures being taken to help people. 

  • Validate their feelings, fears, and anxiety. Don’t be afraid to check in regularly. Ask how your child is feeling. Have they heard any new information about COVID-19 they would like to talk about? Be a safe and supportive outlet for your child. 

High School-Aged Students

  • Discuss the issue in a more in-depth fashion. Ask and answer questions. 

  • Together, look at appropriate sources of COVID-19 facts. Provide factual information about the current status of COVID-19. Having such knowledge can help facilitate a sense of control and limit anxiety. 

Resources:


March 22, 2020 

At Holly School District, we are saddened to announce that our facilities will be closing for onsite learning in response to the COVID-19 epidemic. After receiving further guidance from Prowers County Health Department, the difficult decision has been made to close our doors at least until Thursday, April 16, 2020. Although no known cases have been confirmed in Prowers County that we are aware of, recent local, state and national social-distancing guidelines have impacted our community while necessitating the need for school closures to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. During the closure, Holly School will partner with families to provide remote learning opportunities for all students beginning Tuesday, March 24th in the afternoon. Guidance on packet/material pick-up will be coming out on Monday. Administration and staff are currently planning an on-site delivery model for supplemental instruction, which will include online and/or paper-based resources for our students depending on individual needs and internet access throughout our community. We will be reaching out to parents and guardians on Monday, March 23rd to help determine which remote instructional delivery methods work best for our families. We understand that a one-size-fits-all approach to remote learning does not work in our rural community. Holly School is also concerned about student nutrition and is dedicated to providing nutritional services during the closure. Our phone survey on Monday will give us some ideas about the number of families in need. Currently, we are planning a grab-and-go style breakfast and lunch. We will send out additional information as soon as all of the details are worked out and a solid plan is in place. We understand that school closures place a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety on students and families. This has been a difficult decision; however, the health, safety, and well-being of our school community is the priority as we navigate this unprecedented event. We will do everything in our power to make this transition as smooth as possible for everyone involved. Holly School will continue to update our families and community throughout this rapidly evolving situation as guidelines and mandates are issued by local and state agencies. Please check the school website, your email, the main entrance of the school, and the Holly Post Office for regular updates as information becomes available. Thank you for your patience, trust, and support during this challenging crisis. Together, as a community, we will get through this while continuing to support each other.

Sincerely,

Jackie Crabtree


From CHSAA:



Colorado High School

Activities Association

14855 East 2nd Avenue

Aurora. CO 80011

(303) 344-5050

Issued: March 17, 2020 Contact: Bert Borgmann

Telephone: (303) 344-5050 Laikyn Cooper

Fax Number: (303) 367-4101 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PreRel#27-19-20


Important CHSAA COVID-19 Update


Aurora, CO – The Colorado High School Activities Association, following the most recent recommendation of state and federal health officials, has announced changes in the spring sports and activities schedules. 


“In light of Governor Jared Polis’ announcement Monday (March 16) afternoon where new restrictions were mandated to slow the advance of the COVID-19 virus narrowing the minimum standards for public gatherings, we are announcing that the Association will follow the guidelines that went into effect at 8:00 a.m. today and will remain in effect for 30 days,” CHSAA Commissioner Rhonda Blanford-Green said. “This media and school advisory is to keep the membership apprised of the latest decisions from the CHSAA office.” 


These updates include:


  • The Spring Sports moratorium is extended through April 18. CHSAA encourages schools to set stricter standards on student gatherings outside of the high school.

  • All CHSAA Music Events have been cancelled for 2020.

  • The CHSAA Hall of Fame, scheduled for April 14, has been cancelled.

  • The CHSAA Legislative Council meeting, scheduled for April 15, has been postponed pending changes in the public gathering restrictions.

  • The State Speech Tournament and Student Leadership Advisor U have been postponed until later in the spring pending changes in the public gathering restrictions.

  • The CHSAA office will remain closed until March 30, with staff working remotely from home.


The CHSAA will recognize individual participants from the CHSAA State Basketball Championships with a memento in the coming weeks to recognize their leadership and resolve during that week.


National and state decisions related to the COVID-19 virus are changing daily, even hourly, so new updates will be posted on CHSAANow.com and communicated via email to schools and media.

Resources for Families

If you need assistance, please use the following links.  
You can apply for benefits programs online.  You can also apply for medical assistance at https://connectforhealthco.com/.  
If you do not have internet access, you can call our office ahead of time and staff can mail an application to be completed, or call Hunger Free Colorado who can complete the application for them over the phone.  The Hunger Free phone number is 855-855-4626. 

COVID Parent Letter, 3/23/20

 HOLLY SCHOOL  RE-3wildcatlogo

Dusty Heck, PreK-12 Principal

d.heck@hollyschool.org

719-537-6616; Fax 719-537-0315

P.O. Box 608

206 N. 3rd St. 

Holly, CO  81047




Dear Parents/Guardians:


For the week of March 23rd through March 30th.  The Holly School District is planning on having learning packets available for remote learning, available for pick up Tuesday, March 24th from 12-4:30 PM.  If you are unable to pick up your packet during this time please call the school during normal school hours. Students will be receiving review packets for this week, we are planning on more of an online classroom format for the JH/HS classes when possible.  When returning your students work please drop it off Monday March 30th from 12-4:30 PM.  


When dropping off/picking up student packets we are having a drive-through plan, please remain in your vehicles and we will have a staff member available to gather materials to bring it out to your vehicle.


We know that this is a new adventure for all of us.  Please be understanding and patient as we work together to make the learning experience for your child as beneficial as possible.  We also ask for your support to make sure that your child completes their assignments.  


If you have any questions please feel free to give us a call here at the school Monday through Thursday 8 AM-4:30 PM.





Sincerely,




Dusty Heck






Home of the Holly Wildcats!

Accepting Bids:

Holly School District is accepting bids on a 1997 54 passenger IHC 3800/Bluebird Bus. Approximately 177,000 miles. DT466 engine with mechanical injection fuel system. Spicer 5 speed manual transmission. Hydraulic brakes with all 4 wheel ends having disc brakes. 10R22.5 10 hole Budd style wheels. Steering tires 90% tread, Traction tires 75% tread. The bus can be seen at the Holly School District bus garage, 206 North Third Street in Holly, CO. Call 719-537-6616 for more information.


Current Openings:  

K-12 Music/Band Teacher

Mail Applications: P.O. Box 608, Holly, CO 81047
Email Applications: s.schenck@hollyschool.org

Contact Information:
206 North Third   P.O. Box 608   Holly,Co 81047

Holly School 719-537-6616
Holly Daycare 719-537-5920
Holly Bus Barn 719-537-5921
Holly School Fax 719-537-0315


Holly School District Mission
The Holly School District shall strive to provide a safe environment for all students and staff and meaningful opportunities and innovative educational programs for all
students so that they reach their learning potential, including the attainment of the district’s academic standards, through partnerships between home, school and the community.


Holly School